Looking Closely…

I took a little walk about the yard looking closely to see what I could see with my little pocket camera. The birds can ice skate in the bird feeder.

Mini icicles. It’s rare for us to get the large cool ones that Jill showed us.

These might be the needle ice crystals Jill showed on her blog. This is my blueberry bush.

This plant is my thyme.

As I drove out of our neighborhood I spied the snowman built by the kids down the street.

Then I saw this…a frozen spider web.

It was good to take the time to look closely. Have you had some time to look carefully and closely at the world around you?

13 thoughts on “Looking Closely…

  1. OK, that is totally a first for me….a FROZEN SPIDER WEB???!?!?!?!! That is really amazing!!! The little needle ice crystals are cool, too! We always get the great big icicles. You can hear them hit the ground when they snap off. They’re often as big around as hotdogs and can be up to 15″ long. They’re pretty, but they sure would be dangerous if you got hit with one falling from above!!!

  2. So fun it is to wander with camera in hand, looking at everything around you. Sometimes it is a challenge to find something that piques your interest which generally means you are distracted. Good job!

  3. What great pictures of looking closely!!! I too have inspired by Jill’s photography and now by yours. Our snow is disappearing fast as it is unusually mild these days – so wierd. I long for a frozen lane and driveway and I don’t even like Winter. Too muddy and dreary. Maybe I should look closely at the mud – do you think?? Have a great weekend my friend!

  4. Oh that spider web!!!! Fantastic shot!
    The ice needles…I think they are a form of hoar frost, which is an equally facinating structure. Take a google search to the cal tech snowflake page and there is a whole section on hoar frost.
    Love the snow man. Jolly times in WA!

  5. Rime Formations! From the frost section of the Snowflake guide:

    Snow crystals accumulate rime when they collide with water droplets in the clouds. When the clouds are near the ground you have fog, and sometimes the fog is made from supercooled water droplets — water at a temperature below the freezing point. Then the droplets freeze on contact to anything they hit, sometimes yielding some bizarre, wind-driven rime formations.

    The pictures in the guide aren’t as interesting as yours…

  6. Nice shots! Wandering around with the camera, and looking closely, is one of my favourite things to do. Jill’s inspiring me as well with all her snowflake pictures – but we’ve had a thaw!! But I’m sure there will be more snow before winter is over :)

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