Adieu…

I enjoyed reading the origins of adieu this morning.

This was taken at the Hailes Abbey (a 13th century Cistercian Abbey) nr. Winchcombe, Gloucester, England in 2004.

We board a British Airways flight today for London. My posting will be scarce if at all. I’m hoping to try to post a few postcards like Judy at My Front Porch. Time will tell. In the meantime you will know why I’m not visiting your blogs during this time. Blessings!

Outdoor Wednesday ~ Stage Coach Inn Museum

Outdoor Wednesday is hosted by Susan at A Southern DayDreamer. Visit her to join in or to see more Outdoor scenes around the world.

I’ve seen signs for this historical sight in Thousand Oaks, California for a few years now and finally decided to stop and have a look. This historical information was copied from The Stagecoach Inn Museum Website.

The original Stagecoach Inn was called the Grand Union Hotel and it was built in 1876. It was moved from it’s original location closer to the Ventura Fwy. to this property further West on Ventu Park Road.

This is a collage of the Inn and the Schoolhouse built on the sight to portray a School from the 1890’s.

This schoolhouse built on the grounds is a replica of a 1890 Schoolhouse. The contents of the room and its dimensions were found in historical records.

The Tri-Village, made up of replicas of a pioneer home, a Spanish-Mexican adobe and a Chumash Ap (tule dwelling). It represents the three historic eras in the Conejo Valley.

No photos were allowed in the Museum itself but each room is filled with great histiorical period pieces some original to the Hotel or the owners over the years. There is one room full of gramophones and gramophone accessories. It really is worth a visit.

Thanks for stopping by and now I’m off to your Outdoors!

Window Views ~ Adamson House, Malibu

My Window Views this week are all from the Historic Adamson House in Malibu, California.

This is the rear view of the home which is right on the beach in Malibu just north of the Malibu Pier which the original family who owned the home had built.

This is a view from one side of the home.

To see more Window Views visit the Window Views Blog. A big thank you to Mary for coming up with this weekly event.

Window Views ~ Heritage Square

The windows I’m sharing today are from the Hale House at Heritage Square in Los Angeles. The buildings housed here were all moved from different areas in Los Angeles for the purpose of preserving them and restoring them. To read more about this site and the buildings preserved just click on this link.


The Hale House was built in 1887 by George W. Morgan, a land speculator and real estate developer, at the foot of Mount Washington just a few blocks from the museum in Highland Park. From the time of its construction, the house was sold many times and was moved from 4501 to 4425 North Pasadena Avenue (now Figueroa Street) before being purchased by James G. Hale in 1906.

The eight historic structures located at the museum, constructed during the Victorian Era, were saved from demolition and serve as a perfect background to educate the public about Southern California’s early development. From the simplicity of the Octagon House to the opulence of the Perry Mansion, the Museum provides a unique look at the lifestyles of the people who contributed so much to the development of modern Los Angeles.

To see more window views visit the Window Views Blog.

ht: HSM Website

San Francisco ~ Saints Peter and Paul Church

There was so much to share from my extended weekend in San Francisco in December and then Christmas took over as it should. Now that life is a little slower I’ll share another beautiful church I visited.

The present church, with its twin lofty spires that soar 191 feet into the sky, was completed in 1924. For over a century, the church of SS. Peter and Paul has served parishioners, charmed the numerous tourists who visit it daily, and has been an inspiration to the members of the North Beach community. A ribbon of verse from Dante’s “Paradiso” spans the facade and translates:

 “The glory of Him who moves all things
penetrates and glows throughout the universe.”

This mosaic inscription placed just above the three entrances to the church connects the four large pillars upon which rest the symbols of the four Evangelists: Matthew (An angel), Mark (A lion), Luke (An ox) and John (An eagle). Original plans, regrettably laid away to rest, called for spectacular outdoor mosaics covering the entire facade. The twin spires (191 feet) have become a landmark in the area. The church is 100 feet wide and 160 feet long. The magnificent rose window measures fourteen feet in diameter.

ABC Wednesday ~ Mary Magdalen Church, Camarillo

M is for St. Mary Magdalen Church in Camarillo, California

In my Sky Watch #10 Post I mentioned that I was trying to get inside St. Mary Magdalen Church in Camarillo to see their historic stained glass windows. A few Sundays ago we went to the church grounds to buy some home made Mexican food at a fiesta they were putting on as a fund raiser. While there I was thrilled to see the church doors open and I went inside and was able to finally see and take pictures of these amazing works of art.

Here is an excerpt written in a historical site about the windows.

“The most notable chapel fixtures were its magnificent 13 stained glass windows.  These azure, crimson, green, and gold windows tell a double story — one of the life of Christ, the other of a world at war.

While on a trip to Europe, Juan Camarillo selected the windows in Munich, Germany. The year was 1913 and the early rumbles of the continent gathering its strength for conflict were growing with each passing day. Somewhere between the studios of glass-blower F. X. Zettler of Munich and the church on a hilltop in faraway Camarillo, the stained glass windows were lost. Zettler’s name can be seen at the bottom of the windows depicting the Holy Family (east side) and Christ with the children (west side). Despite the best efforts of the Camarillo family through consuls and ambassadors, the windows appeared lost forever. Mrs. Carmen Camarillo Jones recalled that her uncle Juan feared they were at the bottom of the sea. One day a letter arrived from a German official. This official in Munich had been noticing several large crates staked outside a building with Juan’s name on them. He had written Juan several letters and finally one got through at the end of Word War 1. Much to the joy and relief of everyone, the lost windows had been found. However, it was a painfully slow and long trek to Los Angeles, and then on to Camarillo, before they were finally installed in the thick brick and plastered chapel walls in 1919.”

After I had been in the church for about 5 minutes the caretaker came in and closed the doors behind me I figured my time inside was over.

To see more of the outside of this historical church click here.

For more ABC posts on the letter M visit the ABC Blog.

The Fountain ~ by James Russell Lowell

The Fountain
~
Into the sunshine,
Full of the light,
Leaping and flashing
From morn till night!

Into the moonlight,
Whiter than snow,
Waving so flower-like
When the winds blow

Into the starlight
Rushing in spray,
Happy at midnight
Happy by day!

Ever in motion,
Blithesome and cheery
Still climbing heavenward,
Never aweary;

Glad of all weathers,
Still seeming best,
Upward and downward
Motion thy rest;

Full of a nature
Nothing can tame,
Changed every moment,
Ever the same;

Ceaseless aspiring,
Ceaseless content,
Darkness or sunshine
Thy element;

Glorious fountain!
Let my heart be
Fresh, changeful, constant,
Upward like thee!

Photos from the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington and from the Historical Olivas Adobe in Ventura, California.

Hope your hearts are content and looking up today! Happy Friday to all!